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Tech Savvy: The Future of TV

Take hulu.com for example. You can go to Hulu.com in your web browser, create a free account and subscribe to any number of popular TV shows. After the TV show has aired, it will become available in your Hulu queue. Hulu will even send you a reminder email that you have new shows available. To watch the show, simply log in to Hulu.com and browse you queue. Click on the episode you want to watch and off you go! These show do have commercials, but they have FAR fewer than the broadcast TV version. Typically a 1 hour episode will have 4-5 30 second commercials in the Hulu version of the episode. This means you can watch the entire episode in about 42 minutes versus the 60 minutes it would take on regular TV. You can also pause the video and resume it later on on Hulu.

Hulu is not the only service that offers this type of internet TV viewing. Often the television networks themselves(NBC/ABC/CBS/FOX) will allow you to watch their shows on their web pages. I prefer Hulu because it acts as a central consolidation point for all the major networks and it has a nice video viewer for your web browser.

Thus far I have described watching these internet TV episodes on your computer but what if you want to watch them on that big TV in your den? Simple, just connect the video output from your computer to your TV. Now you can watch these videos, from the internet on your TV! There are lots of variables depending on the type of TV you have and the type of computer you have but you can pretty much connect any PC to any TV and use the TV as a large computer screen.

So what does all of this mean for the TV of the future? Well, if you think about it, most TV's today are simply large, dumb screens. The "brains" are in the cable or satellite box that provides the video signal to the TV. So we are not that far away from replacing that cable box or satellite box with a computer that connects to the internet and "pulls" video from internet sources instead of a satellite dish or cable line. As a matter of fact, there are some TV's and Blu Ray players selling today that can connect directly to the internet and pull down video to display on the TV. If you have the Sony Playstation of Microsoft Xbox 360 in your home they can also be used to watch internet video sources on your TV.

I personally think the direction we are headed is pretty exciting. What it means in the end is more choice and more freedom for consumers to watch watch they want, when they want on the screen they want. Freedom to choose is always a good thing.

As always, if you have any questions, or would like to suggest a topic for an article please email me at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or call (229) 269-4151